Sps Agreement Upsc

Posted by tommy

Since our topic is the ban on EU mango, we are focusing on the SPS agreement. Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS) is a WTO agreement that… The two agreements have a number of common elements, including fundamental non-discrimination obligations and similar requirements for prior notification of proposed measures and the creation of information offices (“Information Points”). However, many of the substantive rules are different. Thus, both agreements promote the application of international standards. However, under the SPS agreement, the only justifications for non-application of these standards for food safety and protection of animal/vegetable health are scientific arguments arising from an assessment of potential health risks. On the other hand, under the OBT agreement, governments may decide that international standards are not appropriate for other reasons, including fundamental technological problems or geographical factors. The decision to start the Uruguay Round trade negotiations was taken after years of public debate, including within national governments. The decision to negotiate an agreement on the application of sanitary and plant health measures was taken in 1986 at the beginning of the cycle. The SPS negotiations were opened to the 124 governments that participated in the Uruguay Round. Many governments were represented by their food safety or animal health officers.

Negotiators also drew on the expertise of international technical organizations such as FAO, the code and the OIE. Technical barriers to CTA trade covered by the WTO agreement on technical barriers to trade. References to the previous GATT agreement with the same name are indicated in the form of a “1979” tBT agreement. The SPS agreement includes all the measures to protect: who benefits from the implementation of the SPS agreement? Is the agreement in the interest of developing countries? While a number of developing countries have excellent food security and veterinary and plant health services, others do not. For these organizations, the requirements of the SPS agreement pose a challenge to improve the health situation of their population, population and crops, which may be difficult for some to meet. As a result of this difficulty, the SPS agreement delayed all requirements, with the exception of transparency requirements (notification and creation of investigative bodies), until 1997 for developing countries and until 2000 for least developed countries. This means that these countries are not required to scientifically justify their health or plant health requirements before that date.